Monthly Archives: March 2016

Thriving and Your Identity

While the purpose of this site clearly has been and still is to optimize physical vitality and energy, a whole lot more than technical exercise instruction and adherence is required. We’re not machines; it’s impossible to maintain good fitness habits in a heartless, robotic fashion, at least for long.

What separates us from a machine is a lot of things, but the most important area is the heart. I’m not referring here to the entity that pumps blood through the body and helps maintain life, but rather the soul or spirit identity that reveals our motivations, passions, and purposeful goals.

Image courtesy of khunaspix at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of khunaspix at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

When I exercise, it’s not really about the precision of the movement; sure, doing an exercise properly makes for both safe and effective results, but it’s far more about what within is propelling me to do that which is seen on the outside.

Yesterday, someone told me “You really still have a lot of passion for lifting, even being older.” While I wasn’t especially excited to be referred to as “older,” the younger friend was telling me that he was impressed with the energy I displayed as I moved rapidly from one exercise to another, carrying out each repetition with passionate intent.

Whether or not you’re an athlete or personal fitness trainer, like myself, isn’t the issue here. What does matter is that you find a personal reason for exercise, something that moves your “internal meter.” You may be able to grind out a series of decent workouts for the sole purpose of “looking good for the summer,” but the likelihood of keeping up such a habit that becomes part of who you are is really small without something further driving you.

The subject of internal motivation, your heart, and even your very identity is the stuff of endless books and articles purporting to give you the answers to those essential questions. I believe, though, that who you are is most accurately tied to “whose” you are. It’s this truth and its ramifications for finding genuine identity and purpose that I plan to address in coming articles.