Simple home workout

As an in home personal trainer, this is a very basic, fairly abbreviated workout that I prescribe for some of my clients, especially if I’m unable to be there at the time while he still desires to do home exercises in between sessions with me.

Ideally, you would do this home workout at least twice, maybe three times a week, with at least a full day rest in between any two workouts (eg would be Mon-Wed-Fri, or at least Mon-Thurs).

Since this is for an overall workout, I’ll keep instruction to a necessary minimum. Other articles will be a good bit more detailed for specific at home exercises.

Warm-up the whole body first, as always, for at least five minutes–longer if feel need to loosen up a little more and/or get body further warmed.

Lower body: 3 sets of each of these

Glute-hip raises: lie on your back on the floor, elevating your feet on something (ball, bench, or table, for eg) and raising your hips up while focusing on using the the hamstrings (muscles in the back of the upper leg) to do so. Contract at the top to help maximize muscle stimulation in hamstrings and glutes. (We are starting with these since so many people neglect the backside in their development)

finish stage of glute-hip raise

finish stage of glute-hip raise

Bodyweight squats: stick your tail out enough to ensure curve in lower back (as opposed to rounding your back), dropping down your upper body via the hips and not from your knees. As you start back up, try to drive more from your heels than the front of your feet. (if not used to these, start off by testing your abilities with a chair or couch behind you just in case you lose balance). Click here for in-depth info on how to get the most out of these.

Calf raises: do as many on two legs as you can do with good form (where not using body to jerk self up). If these become too easy over time, you can hold onto dumbbells to increase intensity, or you can do on one leg at a time (can lightly hold onto a rail or put hand against wall for balance). *doing elevated calf raises (placing ball of foot on, say, a stair step while allowing heel to hang) naturally increases the effectiveness.

for calf raises, find surface you can lower your heel from for greater development

for calf raises, find surface you can lower your heel from for greater development

Upper body: 3 sets of each of these

Chest press
with dumbbells (If you have a bench or exercise ball: if not, see pushups shortly below),  focusing on stretch at bottom while ensuring chest muscle activation as much as possible (not dropping too far down though, just to where you get a stretch, under control as you bring weights down). See this article for much greater detail on the most powerful way to benefit from chest work.
*Push Offs: If you want to change things up or have no bench, you can do this highly flexible movement, a sort of “push up-lite” (push-ups can be considered a granddaddy among home exercises). The same principle applies of focusing on form over numbers, getting some stretch as you go to the lowered position.

Dumbbell rows, one arm at a time. Find a bench or about knee-high table (or other reasonably stable and flat surface) to put your non-working side’s hand and knee on. Your leg on the working arm side acts as a part of a tripod with the other two limbs. Focus on form over numbers, just like always, by using your back muscles to pull the weight up instead of your arms. Keep the torso stationary and reasonably close to parallel with the ground.

Shoulder press (standing or seated) with dumbbells: remember to keep elbows pointed straight out to sides (as long as can do so comfortably) to help work more of the overall shoulder. No need to lock out totally at the top, just go up as high as comfortable, then come down under control. (see article for thorough instruction of seated version)

client using exercise ball in this instance, with spotting behind him for safety

client using exercise ball for seated press, with spotting behind him for safety

Pull ups/chin ups/exercise bands pulldown–you can use either a pronated grip (hands away) or supinated (hands toward you), depending on preference. As always, focus on form and feel, like you’re using your back muscles to pull you up and the arms are more or less secondary in the movement. Focusing on staying under control and not being as concerned about numbers will help go a long way toward both safety and getting the most out of the exercise for muscle building. An example of this is not bouncing out of the bottom. Rather, descend under control and without free-hanging at the very bottom.

(If you don’t have a chin up bar, you can use exercise bands, placing the anchor as high up on the door as possible, crouching on knees, grasping handles and pulling them downward just past your chin)

Bicep dumbbell curl (optional): the upper arm and elbow should remain in the same place, with the forearm being all that moves. This ensures the most activation of your biceps. Supinate the hand (palm of hand out/up from the outset if comfortable enough, as this gives you the most stimulation of the bicep. See this article for more info. For bit of variety, use a “hammer grip,” which will work biceps less but forearms more (see pic below)

for bicep variety, do hammer curls (palm of hand toward body) to hit the forearm more

for bicep variety, do hammer curls (palm of hand toward body) to hit the forearm more

Crunches: Finish with some of these for the core. There are many midsection exercises we will soon discuss, but at least that way you’re doing something for the core in the meantime.

In order to maximize your home workouts, always feel free to ask any questions or have something clarified

Bert